25-30 August 2019
Henry Ford Building
Europe/Berlin timezone

Assessment of the Lung Compliance Changes caused by Fibrosis using Hyperpolarized Xenon MRI

Not scheduled
4h
Harnack House and Henry Ford Building

Harnack House and Henry Ford Building

Board: 526
Poster Posters

Speaker

Mr Ming Zhang (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China)

Description

Pulmonary compliance is an important index for evaluating the function of the lung, which could reflect the pulmonary ability to stretch and expand. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MR is a powerful tool in quantifying the microstructure and function of the lung in vivo, and it has unique advantages in measuring the gas volume in the lung. In this study, a proof-of-concept method was proposed to measure lung compliance via 129Xe ventilation MRI, and the changes in lung compliance caused by fibrosis were quantitatively evaluated.
Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups (n = 5) randomly. The experimental group was treated with 0.4 ml solution of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg body weight), while the control group treated with an equivalent amount (0.4 ml) of normal saline. Pulmonary function tests and MRI experiments were performed on all the rats. Hyperpolarized 129Xe ventilation images with different lung pressure were acquired using multi-slice FLASH sequence, and the lung compliance was determined as the slope of the pressure-volume curve.
A significant difference (p < 0.001) was found in the measured quasi-static compliance between the healthy rats and fibrosis rats, and the mean values of measured lung compliance were 1.27 ± 0.15 and 0.67 ± 0.12 ml/cm H2O, respectively. Additionally, the lung compliance derived from xenon MRI was found decreased obviously (p = 0.003) from 0.40 ± 0.05 ml/cm H2O to 0.25 ± 0.06 ml/cm H2O in fibrosis rats. The lung compliance measured by two different methods has a strong correlation (r = 0.89, p = 0.001).
Our study demonstrated the feasibility of hyperpolarized 129Xe ventilation MRI in measuring lung compliance in vivo, which extends the potential applications of gas MRI in pulmonary functional evaluation.

Primary authors

Mr Ming Zhang (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Prof. Haidong Li (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Mr Hongchuang Li (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Prof. Xiuchao Zhao (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Ms Yeqing Han (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Prof. Xianping Sun (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Prof. Chaohui Ye (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China) Prof. Xin Zhou (State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China)

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